Do ATV Tires Have Tubes? (Are They Tubeless?)

  • By: Kevinsmak
  • Date: September 21, 2022
  • Time to read: 6 min.
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Almost all ATV tires are tubeless. That’s right; there is no tube inside the tire. ATV tires have low pressure and are built to endure rocky terrain with sharp items. Although installing a tube is an option, tubeless ATV tires are more durable and provide a smoother ride.

An All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) is a vehicle that is built to go off-road. These vehicles have four large, low-pressure tires that allow them to travel over rough terrain.

Many of these vehicles are used for recreation but can also be used for work or utility purposes. ATV tires are designed to be run without tubes, and most riders prefer them that way.

Why are ATV Tires Tubeless?

As stated earlier, most, if not all, ATV tires are tubeless. So why is that?

Well, there are several reasons. Read on as I discuss the pros and cons of using tubeless tires in detail.

Pros of ATV Tubeless Tires

The advantages that come with using tubeless include:

Durability

Without a tube, there is one less thing that can puncture or fail. This makes for a more durable tire that can withstand sharp objects and tough terrain.

If you do puncture a tubeless tire, the sealant inside will quickly plug the hole, and you’ll be able to continue on your way.

Lighter Weight

Tubes add weight to the tire, which can have a negative impact on performance. Tubeless tires are lighter and provide better acceleration and handling.

Smooth Ride

Since there is no tube inside the tire, the ride is smoother. This is because there is less friction between the tire and the ground.

When you hit a bump with a tubed tire, the air pressure inside the tube can cause the tire to bounce. This can lead to a jarring and uncomfortable ride.

Better Traction

Tubeless tires provide better traction than their counterparts. This is because they can be inflated to a lower pressure, which allows them to conform to the terrain better.

Tubeless tires can be run at lower pressure without the risk of the tire bouncing or coming off the rim. Low-pressure tires provide better traction on soft surfaces like sand or mud.

Reduce Chances of Flats

Tubeless tires also reduce the chances of getting a flat tire. That’s because there’s no tube for a sharp object to puncture.

Even if the tire does get punctured, the sealant inside will quickly plug the hole.

Better for the Environment

Tubeless tires are also better for the environment. That’s because they don’t require as much rubber and chemicals to produce.

They also last longer, so there’s less waste in landfills.

Cons of ATV Tubeless Tires

Although tubeless tires have many advantages, there are a few disadvantages to consider. These include:

Difficult to Install

Tubeless tires can be difficult to install. That’s because you must correctly seat the tire’s bead on the rim. If not done properly, air leaks, and the tire will come off the rim.

You’ll need a special tool, like a bead breaker, to install a tubeless tire. You may also need soapy water or tire mounting lubricant to help seat the bead.

More Expensive

Tubeless tires are also more expensive than their tubed counterparts. That’s because they’re more difficult to produce and require special tools for installation.

However, you’ll likely save money in the long run as tubeless tires are more durable and last longer.

Step-by-Step Guide on How to Add Tubes to Your Tubeless ATV Tires

You may have your reasons for wanting to add tubes to your tubeless ATV tires. Maybe you got a flat and don’t have a sealant, or you’re riding on a rough trail and want the extra protection.

Whatever the reason, it’s not as difficult as you may think.

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to add tubes to your tubeless ATV tires:

Step 1: Remove the Tire from the Rim

The first step is to remove the tire from the rim. You’ll need a tire iron or lever to do this.

Start by inserting the tire iron under the tire’s bead and prying it up. Work your way around the tire until you’ve completely removed the bead from the rim.

Step 2: Inspect the Rim for Damage

Once the tire is off, inspect the rim for any damage. You’ll need to replace the rim if there are any cracks or sharp edges.

Otherwise, you run the risk of puncturing the tube.

Step 3: Install the Tube

The next step is to install the tube. Start by inflating the tube slightly and then inserting it into the tire. Ensure the valve stem is pointing up so you can easily inflate the tire later.

Once the tube is in, work your way around the tire, pushing the tire’s bead over the rim. You may need to use a tire iron or lever to do this.

Step 4: Inflate the Tire

Once the bead is seated, you can inflate the tire. Start by screwing on the valve cap and then attaching the pump.

Inflate the tire to the manufacturer’s recommended pressure.

Step 5: Re-Install the Tire on the Rim

The final step is to re-install the tire on the rim. Start by inserting one side of the bead over the rim.

Then work your way around the tire until both sides of the bead are seated.

Once both sides are seated, you can inflate the tire to its recommended pressure. You’re now ready to hit the trails.

Disadvantages of Using Tubes in ATV Tires

By introducing tube to your tires, you will experience problems like:

Valve Stem Breakage

The most common disadvantage of using tubes is valve stem breakage. Since the tube sticks out of the tire, it’s susceptible to being damaged by rocks or other debris.

If the valve stem breaks, you’ll have to remove the tire from the rim to fix it. This can be difficult and time-consuming, especially if you’re out on the trails.

Increased Chance of Punctures

Another disadvantage of using tubes is that it increases the chance of punctures. That’s because the tube can be punctured by rocks or other debris.

If the tube punctures, you’ll have to remove the tire from the rim to fix it. This can be difficult and time-consuming, especially if you’re out on the trails.

Tire Balance Issues

Another issue you may experience is tire balance issues. That’s because the tube can throw off the balance of the tire.

This can lead to a rougher ride and increased wear and tear on your ATV.

You Can Get Stuck

The ATV is designed for off-road use, so it’s important to have tires that can handle the terrain. However, if you get a flat with tubes, you may not be able to continue riding.

That’s because the tube can get stuck on the rim, making it difficult to remove.

The disadvantages of using tubes outweigh the advantages; for these reasons, I recommend using tubeless tires on your ATV.

Final Thoughts

Most ATV tires do not have tubes. Tubeless tires are more durable, lighter in weight, and easier to install.

However, you may need to use tubes if you’re riding on a rough trail or want extra protection. Whatever the reason, it’s not as difficult as you may think.

Just follow the steps outlined in this article, and you’ll be able to add tubes to your tubeless ATV tires in no time. Ever wonder where to mount ATV tires?


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